What Works Best For You?
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  • How does your clutter stack up?

    Clutter is:  The boxes you never quite got to after the move; those piles of paper that keep getting bigger; those “things” you just had to have that now fill your basement. 

    How does your clutter stack up?

    © Vertes Edmond Mihai | Dreamstime.com

    Whether it’s at home or in the office, one of the major reasons people have so much clutter is procrastination. We all do it—some more than others—but do you realize how clutter actually affects you and your health?

    Reward in Getting Organized

    Getting organized is unquestionably good for both mind and body — reducing risks for falls, helping eliminate germs and making it easier to find things like medicine and exercise gear.  De-cluttering is also a great stress reliever. Letting go of old junk can be hard at first, but in the end it is completely freeing.

    Resistance to de-cluttering is usually called “hoarding” in medical terms, and is a real clinical condition that can significantly decrease quality of life for the hoarder and for those with whom they live. Compulsive hoarding is often a symptom of larger health problems that can make getting organized extremely difficult, such as an emotional trauma, brain injury and depression.

    Some Helpful Remedies

    No matter how many hills or mountains of clutter you have accumulated, the good news is you have the power to change it. If you’re serious about starting to de-clutter, here are a few tips to help you get started.

    1. De-clutter for 15 minutes every day. It’s amazing how much you can get through if you do it in small increments.
    2. Start at the corner by the door and move your way around your room or work space. De-clutter the surface items first, then empty the bin, etc.  Then repeat, but do more the second time around, e.g., open drawers and cupboards.
    3. Use the “one in, two out” rule:  Whenever you bring in an item, throw away two other items.  You may cheat at first, throwing out two pieces of paper, but soon you will have to move on to bigger stuff.

    For more decluttering tips, visit http://zenhabits.net/15-great-decluttering-tips


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    About Jamie Schwerdtfeger

    Jamie is Office Manager at AlignTech Solutions. Contact her at info@aligntechsolutions.com

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